ANTIQUE NAUTICAL DECOR. NAUTICAL DECOR


Antique nautical decor. Diy room decorations



Antique Nautical Decor





antique nautical decor






    nautical
  • relating to or involving ships or shipping or navigation or seamen; "nautical charts"; "maritime law"; "marine insurance"

  • Seamanship is the art of operating a ship or boat.

  • Of or concerning sailors or navigation; maritime

  • A term relating to sailors and watercraft.





    antique
  • A collectible object such as a piece of furniture or work of art that has a high value because of its considerable age

  • made in or typical of earlier times and valued for its age; "the beautiful antique French furniture"

  • old-timer: an elderly man

  • shop for antiques; "We went antiquing on Saturday"





    decor
  • interior decoration: decoration consisting of the layout and furnishings of a livable interior

  • The decoration and scenery of a stage

  • The furnishing and decoration of a room

  • Interior design is a multi-faceted profession in which creative and technical solutions are applied within a structure to achieve a built interior environment.

  • The style of decoration of a room, building











antique nautical decor - Mermaid Hand




Mermaid Hand Mirror Vintage Antique Nautical Decor


Mermaid Hand Mirror Vintage Antique Nautical Decor



Mermaid Hand Mirror Vintage Antique Nautical Decor is a beautiful Bronzed Resin mermaid mirror with exquisite detailing like the vintage mirrors of times past. The mermaid mirror features patinaed accents that change between purple and copper colorings when moved in the light. Every detail of this reproduction mermaid is historically correct, from her whimsical hair to her shell belly chain. Mermaid hand mirror measures 12" long and 6" wide, and makes a the perfect gift for mermaid fans, fairy princesses, and beach enthusiasts.










77% (17)





Cricket kids - my 'swimming with dolphins' moment.




Cricket kids - my 'swimming with dolphins' moment.





Cricket kids, the way back from the game - Bhavnagar India
My swimming with dolphins moment... and one of my most treasured memories..
For years and years i had driven past a wasteland in the middle of Bhavagnar on my way to the ship-breakers, wishing i could have a game of cricket with the boys that are always there, with upturned bin, plank and old tennis ball... I had to participate, at least once, this blissfully eternal test-match that has spanned, years, decades and probably generations... my chance came a few years ago as i walked through the city at dusk, retracing the automotive journeys, found the wasteland and tentatively walked to the edge of the 'boundary', where the rocks had a chance to sprout properly.
at 6'4 and fresh from an english winter it wasn't long before i was noticed by some of the boys. I shyly gestured the, not only international but adolescent sign language that vocally translates to,"can i play please?" and the game was on the way...
40 glorious minutes of sunset cricket in its rawest most splendid form ensued and so did a gathering crowd. Pretty soon the square was full of a 100 odd fielders watching hoping to witness the big english guy get bowled out by the local speedster...
the sun dispersed, ending that days play, and we victoriously marched back to my hotel...












Small Cannon, Small Bang?




Small Cannon, Small Bang?





Forget the About Us section of our websites, this video explains a lot...I should warn you that there is a short blast of obscene language following the blast of the gun, of which i'm not proud but can't apologise with any sincerity for. My father and my son, joined by our friendly gun-crew at our trinitymarine warehouses...dont you just love it when things are 10x as loud, fun and impressive as you think its going to be.
This is a 1 Pounder! Imagine a 32 Pounder, then imagine 30 of them on some lower gun-deck of a 4 masted schooner like the Victory. Going to re-read my Trafalgar & East India Co books again with this experience in mind...









antique nautical decor








antique nautical decor




Nautical Metal Mermaid Hook Antique Green Decor Bath Kitchen Home Decor






Nautical Metal Mermaid Hook Antique Green Decor Bath Kitchen Home Decor is a beautiful cast iron mermaid wall hook. The mermaid is cast with exquisite details and hand-painted antique rustic green to look and feel like an old antique. The mermaid measures 6 inches long from head to tail, 2.5 inches wide, and will protrude 2 inches from your wall. Use the mermaid hook in your home to hang coats, towels, decorative oven mitts, or give this great gift to a mermaid-loving family member or friend.










See also:

western table decoration

art deco decoration

decorative table cover

cake decorating kits for kids

decorative metal signs

primitive decorating ideas

virtual rooms to decorate



tag: antique  nautical  decor  backyard  decorating  kid  room  college  decoration  decorate 

TINKERBELL ROOM DECORATION : TINKERBELL ROOM


Tinkerbell room decoration : Country decorative pillows.



Tinkerbell Room Decoration





tinkerbell room decoration






    tinkerbell
  • Tinker Bell (sometimes spelled as Tinkerbell, also known as Tink for short), is a fictional character from J. M. Barrie's 1904 play and 1911 novel Peter and Wendy.

  • Paris Whitney Hilton (born February 17, 1981) is an American socialite, heiress, media personality, model, singer, author, fashion designer and actress . She is a great-granddaughter of Conrad Hilton (founder of Hilton Hotels).

  • Anything the existence or power of which depends on the faith of believers





    decoration
  • The process or art of decorating or adorning something

  • the act of decorating something (in the hope of making it more attractive)

  • something used to beautify

  • an award for winning a championship or commemorating some other event

  • A thing that serves as an ornament

  • Ornamentation





    room
  • Space that can be occupied or where something can be done, esp. viewed in terms of whether there is enough

  • Opportunity or scope for something to happen or be done, esp. without causing trouble or damage

  • A part or division of a building enclosed by walls, floor, and ceiling

  • board: live and take one's meals at or in; "she rooms in an old boarding house"

  • space for movement; "room to pass"; "make way for"; "hardly enough elbow room to turn around"

  • an area within a building enclosed by walls and floor and ceiling; "the rooms were very small but they had a nice view"











tinkerbell room decoration - Laughter is




Laughter is timeless, imagination has no age. dreams are forever. tinkerbell Vinyl wall art Inspirational quotes and saying home decor decal sticker steamss


Laughter is timeless, imagination has no age. dreams are forever. tinkerbell Vinyl wall art Inspirational quotes and saying home decor decal sticker steamss



Qty: 1 Wall Art Vinyl Decal
Size: 22 inches in length x 12 inches in height

COLOR: BLACK

Image is not of actual scale. Please view the size above for actual size.

Please be sure to make certain you purchase a QUALITY VINYL WALL ART DECAL. We Only use TOP QUALITY VINYL that lasts for years. Others are selling lower priced wall art by using lower quality vinyl that will fall off after a few days or weeks!

These designs are copyrighted and trademarked by Sakari Graphics. Any products and designs reproduced, distributed, performed, publicly displayed, or made into a derivative work without the permission of Sakari Graphics will be persued for damages as compensation for infringement.










78% (12)





Fairy Room




Fairy Room





I didn't want to do a standard Disney-esque Tinkerbell room, so I used a little imagination. It's still a work in progress. The canopy is a gift from my cousin. The walls are a very light lavender. We chose classic neutral furniture that will grow with daughter.











Fairy Room Window




Fairy Room Window





I dressed up inexpensive Target velvet curtains with beaded leaf "ivy" roping from Michael's. I also wrapped the roping around the metal tiebacks for a "natural" feel.









tinkerbell room decoration








tinkerbell room decoration




Tinkerbell Quote "Laughter Is Timeless" Vinyl Wall Decal Decor Sticker






One Tinkerbell Quote measuring roughly 22" x 12" Manufactured and Marketed Exclusively from The Custom Vinyl Shop. The Custom Vinyl Shop prides ourselves on lightning fast shipment times, We always will ship your decal within 2 days of purchase. We offer over 12 Stock Colors with 50 additional colors available upon request (Slight Delay in Manufacturing time will apply). Please email us after your purchase to specify your vinyl color choice. The Custom Vinyl Shop's vinyl lettering and wall decals are made from the best vinyl on the market, and will last a very long time in your home. All colors are Matte finished for a custom hand painted look, Shiny vinyl is also available upon request. Decorate your home with beautiful and affordable vinyl lettering wall phrases, vinyl art, and words for your walls. It is the newest home decor trend. It's easy to apply and really makes a room look elegant. Words evoke emotions that pictures cannot. The Custom Vinyl Shop Lettering phrases or art will arrive in 1-2 pieces for easy application. Applying our vinyl is like putting a large sticker on your wall and having it look like stenciling, without the work. Thank you for looking!










See also:

boys rooms decoration

free cake decorating books

cupcake room decorations

primitive decorating book

lemon kitchen decorations

christmas cake decorations ideas

decorating ideas for wedding tables



tag: tinkerbell  room  decoration  interior  decorators  design  consultants  western  decorating  supplies 

WESTERN DECORATING TIPS : WESTERN DECORATING


Western Decorating Tips : Decorate The Living Room : Christmas Decorations For Table.



Western Decorating Tips





western decorating tips






    decorating tips
  • Comes in different sizes and used in conjunction with the decorating bag to make different designs.

  • Used to create decorations from icing. The size and shape of the opening on the tip will determine the decoration produced when icing is placed in a decorating bag and piped out through the tip.





    western
  • Situated in the west, or directed toward or facing the west

  • (of a wind) Blowing from the west

  • Living in or originating from the west, in particular Europe or the U.S

  • relating to or characteristic of the western parts of the world or the West as opposed to the eastern or oriental parts; "the Western world"; "Western thought"; "Western thought"

  • a film about life in the western United States during the period of exploration and development

  • a sandwich made from a western omelet











western decorating tips - Christmas on




Christmas on the Farm: A Collection of Favorite Recipes, Stories, Gift Ideas, and Decorating Tips from The Farmer's Wife


Christmas on the Farm: A Collection of Favorite Recipes, Stories, Gift Ideas, and Decorating Tips from The Farmer's Wife



Christmas was the be-all, end-all celebration on the farm. Pages and pages on the topic appeared in The Farmer’s Wife, and these pages weren’t just about food—although recipes for all the various components of parties and holiday gift baskets certainly abounded.

The magazine’s experts expounded on the best and latest ways to decorate home, tree, and parcels and to create homemade gifts for family and friends, as well as games to be played to capture the spirit of the season. In short, The Farmer’s Wife presented its own opinion—both grand and humble, broad and minute, and always, always bearing in mind the idea of community among its readers—about the ways in which Christmas should be celebrated.

You’ll find in this book a smattering of that opinion. Here are recipes to see you through the entire Christmas season; gift ideas guaranteed to get your creative juices flowing; tips for decking your halls; and even a few stories to delight both the young and the young at heart.










81% (10)





Almost a Novel




Almost a Novel





The long plaque on top reads:

The Three Fires

According to their oral traditions, the Odawa, Ojibwa, and Potawatomi once constituted a single people, with a common culture and language. After migrating from the North Atlantic Coast to the Straits of Mackinac, the original group split into three groups, each assuming its own identity long before Europeans arrived in the mid-1600s.
Known as the three fires, the Odawa, Ojibwa, and Potawatomi shared common principles that influenced their response to the Europeans. All three groups emphasized individual human dignity and believed that no person should determine another's fate. Members of each group relied on one another in times of need, sharing goods, labor, and food. They also believed in protecting the ecological balance that links all life. To them, the earth's resources were not meant to be owned or exploited for the exclusive benefit of any individual or group.
The lives of the people of the Three Fires were changed forever by the arrival first of French and British explorers, traders, and missionaries, and later American settlers. Traders exchanged cloth, metal tool, and guns for furs, missionaries sought to convert Indians to the religions of Europe, and after the American Revolution, settlers and the new Federal Government wanted title to Indian land.

Between 1795 and 1842, the American government made treaties that took almost all of Michigan's 57,900 square miles. In return for their land, the Indians received cash and manufactured goods, and teachers, farmers, and blacksmiths to help them adapt to a new way of life. Indian negotiators also secured the right to continue hunting and fishing on government owned land, as well as access to health care and to public education. In recent years, treaty hunting and fishing provisions have been upheld in landmark court cases.
Determined to maintain a home in the land that was once exclusively theirs, contemporary Indian leaders continue to battle for their treaty rights and to seek additional compensation for the land their ancestors were compelled to surrender.

The first green plaque on the left reads:

Odawa (Ottawa)

At the beginning of the 19th century, an estimated 5,000 to 10,000 Odawa fished, raised crops, and hunted throughout the western half of Michigan from the Kalamazoo River north to the straits of Mackinac. From late spring to early fall they lived together in villages numbering as many as 500 people. Each village was an independent political unit, but in times of trouble nearby villages often joined together for mutual protection.
The Odawa were highly regarded for their negotiating and diplomatic skills. When the French arrived in North America in the 1600s, the Odawa established themselves as middlemen in the fur trade, securing pelts from Indian groups farther west and supplying them to French traders in exchange for manufactured goods. In the 1760s, the Odawa joined the French in their battle with the British for dominance in North America. Pontiac and other Odawa leaders used their trade network to forge a great coalition of Michigan Indians that capture Fort Michilimackinac and every other British post west of Niagara except Detroit. Pontiac laid siege to Detroit, but military authorities had been warned of his plans and the effort failed. Had he been successful, the British would have been driven from Michigan.
There were several Odawa villages along the Grand River. One on West Bank, at the foot of the rapids south of today's Bridge Street, was led during the 1820s by Noaquakesick, who was known to the early settlers as Noonday. Other villages were loacted on Lake Michigan at the mouths of the Muskegon, Pere Marquette, and Manistee Rivers, and along the Grand and Thornapple Rivers. L'Arbre Croche, at the northern tip of Michigan's lower peninsula, was the largest and most important village and large numbers of Odawa gathered in the region each summer.
Odawa life was closely tied to the seasons, spring was a time for coming together to celebrate the end of winter and to conduct ceremonies marking births, marriages, deaths, and other life passages. Summer was for planting crops, gathering wild foods, socializing, and village activities. Fall brought the harvest, preparation for the harsh winter months, and the breakup of the village into family groups that fanned out to family hunting territories.

The middle green plaque reads:

Ojibwa (Chippewa)

In the days before European contact, the Obijwa were divided into two distinct groups, one concentrated in the Eastern half of Michigan's lower peninsula, and the other living in the upper peninsula and further west and north in Wisconsin and Canada. Within these groups, whose population totaled about 15,000 to 20,000, there may have been as many as 50 distinct local bands.
All Ojibwa shared a common language and culture and were linked by a system of clans that united people of one village with those from another. M











486 Broadway Building




486 Broadway Building





Broadway, SoHo Cast Iron Historic District, Soho, Manhattan

The SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District lies in part within the western section of the Bayard Farm and during the 18th Century there was little change in its rural character.

This was due to the fact that it was cut off by natural barriers from the settlement at the lower tip of Manhattan. The Collect Pond and the stream flowing from it, Smith's Hill, Bayard's Hill and Lispenard's Meadow (Cripplebush Swamp) all combined to slow the northward expansion of the City. Broadway was not extended north of Canal Street until after 1775 and the surrounding land, even at this date, was still being farmed.

When the Revolution erupted, a series of fortifications and redoubts were built across Manhattan. There were two forts on Mercer Street between Broome and Spring streets; a third was located in the center of the block bounded by Grand, Broome, Mercer and Greene streets and another stood between Grand and Broome Streets, Broadway and Crosby Street.breastworks stretched across Broadway a few feet north of Grand Street.

The Early Republic

As a result of financial difficulties caused by the Revolutionary War, Nicholas Bayard, the third of that name, was forced to mortgage his West Farm. It was divider into lots at the close of the 18th Century but very little development took place until the first decade of the 19th Century.

As early as 1794, the area near the junction of Broadway and Canal Street had attracted a few manufacturing businesses. On the northwest comer of the intersection stood the cast-iron foundry and sales shop of Joseph Blackwell, wealthy Merchant and owner of Blackwell's Island.

Next to his property was that of y Thomas Duggan who owned a number of lots along Canal Street which was then called Dugyan Street. He operated a tannery near Blackwell's foundry.

By the early 1800s, landowners in the area had begun to petition the Common Council to drain and fill the Collect Pond, its outlet to the Hudson River and Lispenard's Meadow. What had been a bucolic retreat for the residents of the Dutch and English town had become a serious health hazard to the citizens of the City end an impediment to its development.

The shores of the Collect were strewn with garbage and the rotting carcasses of dead animals, the stream along Canal Street was a sluggish sewer of green water and parts of Lispenard's Meadow were a bog that yearly claimed a number of cows. It was also a breeding ground for the mosquitoes that almost every summer spread the dreaded yellow fever plagues.

After years of bickering and numerous plans and proposals, Bayard's Hill which stood over one hundred feet above the present grade of Grand Street and the other hills in the vicinity were cut down and used, together with the City's rubbish, to fill in the marshy land.

In 1809, Broadway was paved and sidewalks were constructed from Canal Street to Astor Place and serious development of the area began. However, even before this, a number of prominent men had chosen to build their houses along this section of Broadway. Citizen Genet, James Fennimore Cooper, Samuel Lawrence and the Reverend John Livingston all lived near the intersection of Spring Street and Broadway.

Spring Street was one of the earliest streets opened for development and the oldest house in the Historic District still stands on Spring Street. It is No. 107, a frame house with a brick front built by Conrad Brooks, a shoemaker, about 1806.

Another early house on Spring Street is the Wlliam Dawes house at No. 129 which was built in 1817. As late as the 1950s a well of Manhattan Company which used to supply water to the City was located in an alley behind the house.

It was in this well that the body of Juliana Elmore Sands was discovered on January 2, 1800, and its discovery electrified the community. A young man named Levi Weeks who was said to be her fiance was arrested for her murder. He was defended, among others, by Aaron Burr, one of the organizers of the Manhattan Company, and by Alexander Hamilton.

It is ironic that these two men should join in the defense of Weeks but it indicates the enormous amount of public excitement and interest in the case. After three days of testimony before a packed courtroom and with hundreds of people crowded in the street outside, the jury found Weeks innocent of the charges It was determined that the young woman had committed suicide in a fit of melancholy.

But rumors about the affair persisted and tales of a white robed figure moaning at the well and alarm bells in the night continued for many years after the event.The mystery remained unique in the folklore of the City until the murder of Mary Rogers, a salesgirl in a cigar shop in the St. Nicholas Hotel, forty years later.

The sections of the hotel that are still standing on Broadway near Spring Street may occupy the site of this earlier hotel. The murder was described in depth by Edgar Allen Poe in his short story "T









western decorating tips








western decorating tips




Ralph Lauren






The landmark volume celebrating the life and work of Ralph Lauren, now available in a smaller, more portable edition. Unlike many designers, Ralph Lauren is not known for a single signature look, but rather for his sweeping dreams of American living. Over the course of his career, the images of luxury, adventure, and beauty that he created have come to define American style.
In this visually stunning book, Lauren speaks candidly about himself and his art. In part one, we get to know the designer through never-before-seen pictures of him in private life and with his family, living the lives he designs for. In his own words, we hear about his life, work, and inspiration.
In the second part, Lauren displays and writes about his most important, most iconic, and most beloved work, hand-picked from hundreds of runway shows, collections, and his signature cinematic advertising campaigns. Lauren’s aesthetic influence and unique design sensibility are captured here by fashion’s finest photographers, including Bruce Weber, Deborah Turbeville, and Patrick Demarchelier.
Now available to a larger audience at a more accessible price, this unique fashion monograph is a personal expression of the artist and a rare peek into the mind of one of America’s most accomplished fashion designers of all times.


Ralph Lauren isn’t easy to define. Unlike many designers, he is not known for a single signature look, but rather for his sweeping dreams of American living. Over the course of his career, the images of luxury, adventure, and beauty that he created have come to define American style. In this visually stunning book, Lauren speaks candidly for the first time ever about himself and his art. In part one, we get to know the designer through never-before-seen pictures of him in private life and with his family, living the lives he designs for. In his own words, we hear about his life, work, and inspiration. In the second part, Lauren displays and writes about his most important, most iconic, and most beloved work, hand-picked from hundreds of runway shows, collections, and his signature cinematic advertising campaigns. Lauren’s aesthetic influence and unique design sensibility are captured here by fashion’s finest photographers, including Bruce Weber, Deborah Turbeville, and Patrick Demarchelier. Featuring an introduction by Audrey Hepburn (from her 1992 presentation speech at the CFDA awards), this is truly a unique fashion monograph, a personal expression of the artist, and a rare peek into the mind of one of America’s most accomplished fashion designers of all times.
Sample images from Ralph Lauren:



Click on the thumbnails for larger images










See also:

red apple decor

birthday cake decorating ideas for girls

garden decor online

christmas door decorating themes

decorate your office cubicle

mens bathroom decor

english country decorating pictures

retro room decor

christmas outdoor yard decorations

garden decor home



tag: western  decorating  tips  hannah  montana  room  decoration  top  of  cabinets